Summary of Course Requirements:

Math Requirement: 2 Courses
MEAM Core Requirement: 5 Courses
Electives Requirement: 3 Courses
Seminar Requirement*: 2 Semesters
*Full time students only. There is no charge for the seminar course.

Total = 12 Courses

MSE students in excellent academic standing (GPA of 3.5 or better) may take up to five courses each semester. All MSE students are required to take two mathematics (ENM) courses chosen from a pre-approved list. The remaining courses may be chosen from the appropriate pre-approved list for the chosen concentration area, in consultation with the student’s academic advisor. Learn more...

Helpful Links:

Course List

MEAM Graduate Group

Faculty Lab Websites

SEAS Graduate Handbook

Master's Degree Requirements

To earn an MSE degree in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MEAM), a student must complete 12 graduate level courses. Of the 12 courses, two must be MEAM seminar courses, at least five must be MEAM courses, two must be mathematics, and the remaining three are electives. There is one required course for each concentration area. In addition to the one required course for each concentration area, two additional courses must be selected from the preapproved core requirement list for the student’s chosen concentration (Appendix A of the handbook). The remaining two MEAM courses can be any MEAM graduate courses selected by the student in consultation with their advisor. A concentration area should be chosen and declared before the beginning of the second semester of study. One mathematics course must be ENM 510. The second mathematics course can be chosen from the approved list in handbook. The elective courses should also be chosen from the preapproved elective list for the student’s chosen concentratio. Advisor approval is required if a student wishes to take a graduate course not listed. Elective courses are typically in MEAM or other SEAS departments. Courses taken outside of SEAS should be relevant to the student’s career goals or to the subdiscipline of interest to the student. Up to two courses may be transferred from other institutions upon the approval of the Graduate Group Chair. Students may take up to two independent study courses (MEAM 599). Students electing to write a thesis cannot take an independent study course for degree credit.

MSE candidates will choose to concentrate in one of the following areas:

Design and Manufacturing

Design and ManufacturingGlobal business trends have created a demand for companies to rapidly develop new products at lower costs. In response to these demands, companies have been exploring new methods to decrease costs, increase productivity, and create innovative products. In keeping with the needs of local industry the graduate courses in this area prepare students for careers in Product Design and Manufacturing.

Students in the program will study topics such as mechatronics, CAD, computer graphics, industrial design, product design, materials engineering, manufacturing processes, assembly, tolerances, design analysis, plant/process modeling and design, robotics, electrical systems, mechanical systems, controls, intellectual property, and management skills. Graduates of the program will be prepared to be leaders in the global manufacturing environment. Much of our work involves collaborations with, among others, the Departments of Computer and Information Science, Electrical and Systems Engineering as well as the School of Design and the Wharton School of Business Administration. Learn more...

Mechanical Systems: Robotics, and Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

Mechanical SystemsOngoing effort in mechanical systems focuses on modeling and controlling dynamical systems, robotics, design and manufacturing, and micro electromechanical systems (MEMS). The graduate courses provide students with a firm theoretical foundation and the interdisciplinary experimental skills that are necessary for dealing with modern-day complex systems. Much of our work involves collaborations with, among others, the Departments of Bioengineering, Computer and Information Science, Electrical and Systems Engineering as well as the Wharton School of Business Administration.

The laboratory facilities include the General Robotics and Active Sensory Perception (GRASP) Laboratory, the Manufacturing Technologies Laboratory (MTL), the Microfabrication Laboratory, the Center for Human Modeling and Simulation, Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), and the Institute for Medicine and Engineering (IME). Learn more...

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Heat Transfer and Fluid MechanicsAn educational foundation in the thermo-fluids and energy conversion fields is necessary for work in aerospace engineering; in most manufacturing processes such as thin film deposition, plasma and laser processing, joining and welding, fabrication of polymers and metals, ion-beam and electro-discharge machining, cooling of microelectronic equipment and advanced computer chips; as well as in all energy conversion and power generation processes; and in thermal control and treatment of living organisms.

The Penn MEAM MSE program in Thermo-Fluids and Energy is designed to provide the basic tools for dealing with these and other problems of current and future technological interest. The program maintains close collaboration with the departments of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering, Electrical and Systems Engineering, and Materials Science. Learn more...

Mechanics of Materials

Mechanics of MaterialsThe development of new technologies often depends critically on the availability of materials systems capable of withstanding extreme thermomechanical loading conditions. Current examples are provided by the development of advanced engines in the aerospace industry and the design of microchips that are resistant to thermal cycling in the microelectronics industry. In addition, new technologies, such as the biomedical technologies, often require the development and understanding of completely new classes of materials systems.

The Penn MEAM MSE in Mechanics of Materials is designed to provide the basic tools in Mechanics and Materials to tackle these and other problems of current and future technological interest. These include basic courses in continuum mechanics, elasticity, and plasticity, as well as more advanced ones in fracture, composite materials, biomechanics, and atomistic modeling of materials. The program maintains close collaborations with the Material Science Department and with the bio-medical community. Learn more...

Biomechanics

BiomechanicsBiomechanics spans from the molecular level through to tissue-level investigations, with major research efforts in cell mechanics and biophysics, biomolecular simulation, gravity effects on cells and tissues, tendon and ligament injury, repair, regeneration, and intervertebral disc function/degeneration, and targeted drug delivery.

The Penn MEAM MSE in Biomechanics is designed to provide the basic tools to tackle these and other problems of current and future technological interest. Learn more...

Opportunities are also available for students to customize their program with the guidance and approval of their academic advisor. The student and his/her academic advisor should agree upon a program of courses before the student may embark on his/her graduate study.